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A DEMO showing the power of the ANSI (ASCII) _Esc_ codes in standard text mode Python.

ANSI _Esc_ codes here:- http://www.termsys.demon.co.uk/vtansi.htm

There are only three important things from the ANSI _Esc_ codes that are needed to obtain a neat finish to a program written in standard text mode Python:-

1) Clearing the screen. (Already done without the dedicated ANSI _Esc_ code!)

2) Colours and other character attributes. (Already done!)

3) A forced printing of a character or string from a given location inside the Terminal window.

To clear the screen does NOT require another dedicated ANSI _Esc_ code, (although it exists). This code uses the print("\r\n") method which works in all cases coupled with the one function supplied......

For The Classic AMIGA, E-UAE, WinUAE and Linux using Python(s) 1.4.0 to Python 3.2.2. Read the code for more information...

Enjoy finding simple solutions to often very difficult problems...

Bazza, G0LCU.

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# Locate_Demo.py
#
# A DEMO showing the power of the ANSI (ASCII) _Esc_ codes in standard text mode Python.
# This test code was originally written in 2007 for Python 1.4.0 on a standard AMIGA A1200(HD).
# It is now brought up to date and ALSO works on Linux up to Python 3.2.2...
# This code works on Classic AMIGAs, WinUAE and E-UAE using AmigaOS 3.1x and Python
# Version(s) 1.4.0 to 2.0.1, PcLinuxOS 2009 using Python 2.5.2, 2.6.1 and 3.2.2 and
# Debian Linux using Python 2.6.6, 2.7.2 and 3.1.3.
#
# ANSI _Esc_ codes here:-    http://www.termsys.demon.co.uk/vtansi.htm
#
# Issued as Public Domain, you may do with it as you please.
#
# It draws a text mode triangle inside a Python Terminal, writes a string inside that triangle,
# writes a string BELOW the triangle and then resets the cursor to the top of the screen awaiting
# user input. After pressing the <CR> key the screen is cleared and a new text mode _sine_wave_
# graph is plotted, again awaiting user input to clear the screen, finally placing the cursor at
# the top of the Terminal window along with the default string being printed...
# It uses a simple function to draw an ASCII character or string on screen starting at a given,
# [column, line], location.
#
# This function is as thus:-
#
# >>> locate(user_string, horizontal_position, vertical_position)<CR>
#
# <user_string> is a string type, and, <horizontal_position> and <vertical_position> are inetger
# types from 0, (zero) to 255...
#
# The easiest way to run this code, (depending upon the platform), is to type......
#
# >>> exec(open("/full/path/to/Locate_Demo.py").read())<CR>
#
# ......and away you go.
#
# $VER: Locate_Demo.py_Version_0.00.10_(C)2007-2012_B.Walker_G0LCU.

# The only imports required for this demo...
import math
import sys

# Make the whole code 3.x.x compatible too...
if sys.version[0]=="3": raw_input=input

# The only _varaibles_ required for this DEMO...
char="*"
x=20
y=19

# A Simple clear screen command for this DEMO...
for n in range(0, 64, 1): print("\r\n")

# This function is just basic for this DEMO but shows the power of the ANSI _Esc_ codes...
def locate(user_string="$VER: Locate_Demo.py_Version_0.00.10_(C)2007-2012_B.Walker_G0LCU.", x=0, y=0):
	# Don't allow any user errors. Python's own error detection will check for
	# syntax and concatination, etc, etc, errors.
	x=int(x)
	y=int(y)
	if x>=255: x=255
	if y>=255: y=255
	if x<=0: x=0
	if y<=0: y=0
	HORIZ=str(x)
	VERT=str(y)
	# Plot the user_string at the starting at position HORIZ, VERT...
	print("\033["+VERT+";"+HORIZ+"f"+user_string)

# Plot the upwards slope of the triangle...
while x<=35:
	locate(char, x, y)
	x=x+1
	y=y-1

# Plot the downwards slope of the triangle...
while x<=52:
	locate(char, x, y)
	x=x+1
	y=y+1

# Plot the base of the triangle...
char="***********************************"
locate(char, 19, 20)

# Write a string inside the triangle...
char="Drawing in text mode Python."
locate(char, 23, 18)

# Print this line BELOW the triangle...
print("\n\n\nCursor now set to the top.")
# NOW reset the cursor back to the top of the window using the default x and y values.
locate("")

# Hold drawing until user input for sine wave plot...
char=raw_input("Press <CR> to continue with a _sine_ wave:- ")

# A Simple clear screen command for this DEMO...
for n in range(0, 64, 1): print("\r\n")

char="*"
x=3
y=12

# Now plot a sinewave curve inside the Terminal.
for angle in range(0, 360, 5):
	# Generate a FLOATING point sine(angle) value...
	angle=float(angle)
	y=math.sin((angle*(math.pi))/180.0)
	# INVERT, AND, keep the y scan inside the standard Terminal window size.
	y=12-(int(y*10))
	locate(char, x, y)
	# Move along one, (1), x position.
	x=x+1

# Hold drawing until user input for a final clear screen...
char=raw_input("\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nPress <CR> to clear the screen, display the default string, and stop:- ")

# A Simple clear screen command for this DEMO...
for n in range(0, 64, 1): print("\r\n")

# NOW reset the cursor back to the top of the window using the default x and y values
# and display the locate() function's default string...
locate()

# End of Locate_Demo.py Python code...
# Enjoy finding simple solutions to often very difficult problems...

Note that although there may well be other similar things to do this task on the WWW there are NOT any that work on the classic AMIGA variants AND Python(s) 1.4.0 right through to at least 3.2.2... This was originally written in 2007 for the classic AMIGA variants but now given as Public Domain for all...

ANSI _Esc_code colours and attributes have already been done to suit.

Enjoy finding simple solutions to often very difficult problems...

Bazza, G0LCU.

2 comments

Barry Walker (author) 9 years, 3 months ago  # | flag

22-08-2012.

Added MacBook Pro OSX 10.7.3, and Python 2.7.1 running in a default Terminal...

Barry Walker (author) 9 years, 1 month ago  # | flag

Now tested on OSX 10.7.5, and Python Versions, 2.5.6, 2.6.7 and 2.7.1 running in a deafult Terminal...

Bazza, G0LCU...