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A function for pretty-printing a table.

Python, 147 lines
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import cStringIO,operator

def indent(rows, hasHeader=False, headerChar='-', delim=' | ', justify='left',
           separateRows=False, prefix='', postfix='', wrapfunc=lambda x:x):
    """Indents a table by column.
       - rows: A sequence of sequences of items, one sequence per row.
       - hasHeader: True if the first row consists of the columns' names.
       - headerChar: Character to be used for the row separator line
         (if hasHeader==True or separateRows==True).
       - delim: The column delimiter.
       - justify: Determines how are data justified in their column. 
         Valid values are 'left','right' and 'center'.
       - separateRows: True if rows are to be separated by a line
         of 'headerChar's.
       - prefix: A string prepended to each printed row.
       - postfix: A string appended to each printed row.
       - wrapfunc: A function f(text) for wrapping text; each element in
         the table is first wrapped by this function."""
    # closure for breaking logical rows to physical, using wrapfunc
    def rowWrapper(row):
        newRows = [wrapfunc(item).split('\n') for item in row]
        return [[substr or '' for substr in item] for item in map(None,*newRows)]
    # break each logical row into one or more physical ones
#    logicalRows = [rowWrapper(row) for row in rows]
    logicalRows = [(row,) for row in rows]
    # columns of physical rows
    columns = map(None,*reduce(operator.add,logicalRows))
    # get the maximum of each column by the string length of its items
    maxWidths = [max([len(str(item)) for item in column]) for column in columns]
    rowSeparator = headerChar * (len(prefix) + len(postfix) + sum(maxWidths) + \
                                 len(delim)*(len(maxWidths)-1))
    # select the appropriate justify method
    justify = {'center':str.center, 'right':str.rjust, 'left':str.ljust}[justify.lower()]
    output=cStringIO.StringIO()
    if separateRows: print >> output, rowSeparator
    for physicalRows in logicalRows:
        for row in physicalRows:
            print >> output, \
                prefix \
                + delim.join([justify(str(item),width) for (item,width) in zip(row,maxWidths)]) \
                + postfix
        if separateRows or hasHeader: print >> output, rowSeparator; hasHeader=False
    return output.getvalue()

# written by Mike Brown
# http://aspn.activestate.com/ASPN/Cookbook/Python/Recipe/148061
def wrap_onspace(text, width):
    """
    A word-wrap function that preserves existing line breaks
    and most spaces in the text. Expects that existing line
    breaks are posix newlines (\n).
    """
    return reduce(lambda line, word, width=width: '%s%s%s' %
                  (line,
                   ' \n'[(len(line[line.rfind('\n')+1:])
                         + len(word.split('\n',1)[0]
                              ) >= width)],
                   word),
                  text.split(' ')
                 )

import re
def wrap_onspace_strict(text, width):
    """Similar to wrap_onspace, but enforces the width constraint:
       words longer than width are split."""
    wordRegex = re.compile(r'\S{'+str(width)+r',}')
    return wrap_onspace(wordRegex.sub(lambda m: wrap_always(m.group(),width),text),width)

import math
def wrap_always(text, width):
    """A simple word-wrap function that wraps text on exactly width characters.
       It doesn't split the text in words."""
    return '\n'.join([ text[width*i:width*(i+1)] \
                       for i in xrange(int(math.ceil(1.*len(text)/width))) ])
    
if __name__ == '__main__':
    labels = ('First Name', 'Last Name', 'Age', 'Position')
    data = \
    '''John,Smith,24,Software Engineer
       Mary,Brohowski,23,Sales Manager
       Aristidis,Papageorgopoulos,28,Senior Reseacher'''
    rows = [row.strip().split(',')  for row in data.splitlines()]

    print 'Without wrapping function\n'
    print indent([labels]+rows, hasHeader=True)
    # test indent with different wrapping functions
    width = 10
    for wrapper in (wrap_always,wrap_onspace,wrap_onspace_strict):
        print 'Wrapping function: %s(x,width=%d)\n' % (wrapper.__name__,width)
        print indent([labels]+rows, hasHeader=True, separateRows=True,
                     prefix='| ', postfix=' |',
                     wrapfunc=lambda x: wrapper(x,width))
    
    # output:
    #
    #Without wrapping function
    #
    #First Name | Last Name        | Age | Position         
    #-------------------------------------------------------
    #John       | Smith            | 24  | Software Engineer
    #Mary       | Brohowski        | 23  | Sales Manager    
    #Aristidis  | Papageorgopoulos | 28  | Senior Reseacher 
    #
    #Wrapping function: wrap_always(x,width=10)
    #
    #----------------------------------------------
    #| First Name | Last Name  | Age | Position   |
    #----------------------------------------------
    #| John       | Smith      | 24  | Software E |
    #|            |            |     | ngineer    |
    #----------------------------------------------
    #| Mary       | Brohowski  | 23  | Sales Mana |
    #|            |            |     | ger        |
    #----------------------------------------------
    #| Aristidis  | Papageorgo | 28  | Senior Res |
    #|            | poulos     |     | eacher     |
    #----------------------------------------------
    #
    #Wrapping function: wrap_onspace(x,width=10)
    #
    #---------------------------------------------------
    #| First Name | Last Name        | Age | Position  |
    #---------------------------------------------------
    #| John       | Smith            | 24  | Software  |
    #|            |                  |     | Engineer  |
    #---------------------------------------------------
    #| Mary       | Brohowski        | 23  | Sales     |
    #|            |                  |     | Manager   |
    #---------------------------------------------------
    #| Aristidis  | Papageorgopoulos | 28  | Senior    |
    #|            |                  |     | Reseacher |
    #---------------------------------------------------
    #
    #Wrapping function: wrap_onspace_strict(x,width=10)
    #
    #---------------------------------------------
    #| First Name | Last Name  | Age | Position  |
    #---------------------------------------------
    #| John       | Smith      | 24  | Software  |
    #|            |            |     | Engineer  |
    #---------------------------------------------
    #| Mary       | Brohowski  | 23  | Sales     |
    #|            |            |     | Manager   |
    #---------------------------------------------
    #| Aristidis  | Papageorgo | 28  | Senior    |
    #|            | poulos     |     | Reseacher |
    #---------------------------------------------

The quick-and-dirty way of printing table data uses a delimiter - usually tab or space - to indent elements by column. This works fine as long as the elements in each column have the same (or similar) lengths; if not, the output can get pretty messy.

This recipe finds the max required length for each column and uses it to indent its items. Several optional parameters can be set to customize the output.

2 comments

Patrick 7 years, 9 months ago  # | flag

The example looks great... but unfortunately it doesn't work that way on my setup. Basically, the wrap text function doesn't work at all, and every wrapping function gives the same output. Here's a screenshot:

http://screencast.com/t/GJ9p7NgNPh

I'm using Python(X,Y) on Windows:

ActivePython 2.7.5.6 (ActiveState Software Inc.) based on
Python 2.7.5 (default, Sep 16 2013, 23:16:52) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)] on win32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.

Imported NumPy 1.8.0, SciPy 0.13.2, Matplotlib 1.3.1
+ guidata 1.6.1, guiqwt 2.3.1

Any idea what could be wrong?

Thanks!

Jonathan Blakes (author) 7 years, 9 months ago  # | flag

This is a fork, in which as far as I can recall I only changed one line: 24->25. Try the original.