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this is an awk sample

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#!/bin/bash

file=${1:?"file?"}

echo $*
#get the fields
#delete the non-ditital data, user, system, elapsed
#convert the real time 's min:sec
#print the fields

#awk 'BEGIN { FS = "\n"; RS = "" }\
#{print $2}' $file \
sed -n '/.*user.*system.*/p' $file \
|sed -e 's/user//' -e 's/system//' -e 's/elapsed//' |\
awk 'BEGIN { FS = " "; RS = "\n" }\
{split($3, real, ":"); $3=real[1]*60 + real[2]} \
#{printf $1 "\t"$2 "\t" $3"\n"} \
{ user_sum += $1;  sys_sum += $2; real_sum += $3; count++} \
END {printf "user_sum: " user_sum/count "\nsys_sum: " sys_sum/count  "\nreal_sum: " real_sum/count "\n"}'

echo ""

4 comments

J Y (author) 12 years, 3 months ago  # | flag

actions are surrounded by {}

[pattern] [{ action }]

J Y (author) 12 years, 3 months ago  # | flag

string concatenation is performed by writing expressions next to one another

J Y (author) 12 years, 3 months ago  # | flag

AWK doesn't have "types" of variables. There is one type only, and it can be a string or number. The conversion rules are simple. A number can easily be converted into a string. When a string is converted into a number, AWK will do so.

J Y (author) 12 years, 3 months ago  # | flag

awk uses associative array(map), the for statement scans over the [keys]

# Record a 1 for each word that is used at least once
# associate the fields as keys to a number
{
    for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++)
        used[$i] = 1
}

# Find number of distinct words more than 10 characters long
#scan over the keys

END {
    for (x in used)
        if (length(x) > 10) {
            ++num_long_words
            print x
        }
    print num_long_words, "words longer than 10 characters"
}
Created by J Y on Wed, 12 Aug 2009 (MIT)
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