Welcome, guest | Sign In | My Account | Store | Cart

Notice! PyPM is being replaced with the ActiveState Platform, which enhances PyPM’s build and deploy capabilities. Create your free Platform account to download ActivePython or customize Python with the packages you require and get automatic updates.

Download
ActivePython
INSTALL>
pypm install speaklater

How to install speaklater

  1. Download and install ActivePython
  2. Open Command Prompt
  3. Type pypm install speaklater
 Python 2.7Python 3.2Python 3.3
Windows (32-bit)
1.3 Available View build log
1.2 Available View build log
Windows (64-bit)
1.3 Available View build log
1.2 Available View build log
Mac OS X (10.5+)
1.3 Available View build log
1.2 Available View build log
Linux (32-bit)
1.3 Available View build log
1.2 Available View build log
Linux (64-bit)
1.3 Available View build log
1.2 Available View build log
1.3 Available View build log
 
Imports
Lastest release
version 1.3 on Nov 20th, 2012

A module that provides lazy strings for translations. Basically you get an object that appears to be a string but changes the value every time the value is evaluated based on a callable you provide.

For example you can have a global lazy_gettext function that returns a lazy string with the value of the current set language.

Example:

>>> from speaklater import make_lazy_string
>>> sval = u'Hello World'
>>> string = make_lazy_string(lambda: sval)

This lazy string will evaluate to the value of the sval variable.

>>> string
lu'Hello World'
>>> unicode(string)
u'Hello World'
>>> string.upper()
u'HELLO WORLD'

If you change the value, the lazy string will change as well:

>>> sval = u'Hallo Welt'
>>> string.upper()
u'HALLO WELT'

This is especially handy when combined with a thread local and gettext translations or dicts of translatable strings:

>>> from speaklater import make_lazy_gettext
>>> from threading import local
>>> l = local()
>>> l.translations = {u'Yes': 'Ja'}
>>> lazy_gettext = make_lazy_gettext(lambda: l.translations.get)
>>> yes = lazy_gettext(u'Yes')
>>> print yes
Ja
>>> l.translations[u'Yes'] = u'Si'
>>> print yes
Si

Lazy strings are no real strings so if you pass this sort of string to a function that performs an instance check, it will fail. In that case you have to explicitly convert it with unicode and/or string depending on what string type the lazy string encapsulates.

To check if a string is lazy, you can use the is_lazy_string function:

>>> from speaklater import is_lazy_string
>>> is_lazy_string(u'yes')
False
>>> is_lazy_string(yes)
True

New in version 1.2: It's now also possible to pass keyword arguments to the callback used with make_lazy_string.

Subscribe to package updates

Last updated Nov 20th, 2012

Download Stats

Last month:2

What does the lock icon mean?

Builds marked with a lock icon are only available via PyPM to users with a current ActivePython Business Edition subscription.

Need custom builds or support?

ActivePython Enterprise Edition guarantees priority access to technical support, indemnification, expert consulting and quality-assured language builds.

Plan on re-distributing ActivePython?

Get re-distribution rights and eliminate legal risks with ActivePython OEM Edition.